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Posts Tagged ‘street food’

Teriyaki chicken, S$5.50.

Teriyaki chicken, S$5.50.

This was Rick’s choice when we were lunching at Old Airport Road Food Centre. He was browsing the stalls when one of the signboards caught his attention: Holy Grill.

Holy smokes, what a witty name! Amused, he ordered the teriyaki chicken.

Morale of story: Use a catchy and memorable name for your business to stand out from the crowd! (more…)

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Before you groan, “Not another Penang post!”, this is the FINAL post on our June ’09 Penang trip.

We were supposed to leave our hotel at 3pm to catch our flight back to Singapore. Because we had a late, big breakfast, we still weren’t hungry by 2pm. However, I was determined to squeeze in one more meal before leaving Penang!

Plate of fried fritters (3 pieces for RM2.20) & red bean soup, RM1.00

Plate of fried fritters (3 pieces for RM2.20) & red bean soup, RM1.00

The day before, based on CK Lam’s recommendation, we went to an alley along Magazine Road. It’s at the traffic light junction opposite Trader’s Hotel. However, it was already evening, and the stalls had already closed. This time, we were lucky. All the stalls were open! (more…)

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Fried oyster omelette, S$5.00.

Fried oyster egg, S$5.00

I was here to review their signature fried Hokkien prawn mee, but couldn’t resist trying the oyster egg 蚝煎 as well.

Overall, it was very likeable, which means a lot considering I’m not a fan of oyster omelette. The eggs are fried till crisp, and the starch mixture isn’t too gooey. There’s about 4 plump oysters for the cheapest order of S$5. The seasoning is a wee bit spicy, and if you dip it into the accompanying piquant chilli sauce, it’s even more appetizing. (more…)

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On the same day I bought muffins from Bliss Haven, I also checked out the 枪摊 Fried Hokkien mee stall (the stallowner is a single mom with a teenage son). I do enjoy this series for its entertainment value (the episode where that tattooed dude Jason withdrew was damn drama, right??!!). And even though recipes aren’t revealed, we can still pick up some cooking tips from the chef.

Hokkien mee, S$3.00

Fried Hokkien mee, S$3.00

Anyway, back to the food. I rather enjoyed it. It’s the dark sauce stewed type of fried Hokkien mee. I think the selling point is the noodles. The texture is unique, different from the usual flat Hokkien yellow noodles. It’s soft but QQ (al dente) and bouncy at the same time. There’s also no strong alkaline taste. Quite similar to udon, actually. This kind of noodle isn’t commonly found; mentor chef Eric Teo made special arrangements for it to be supplied to this stall. (more…)

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Cheap but yummy yong tau foo.

Cheap but yummy yong tau foo.

People say there’s no such thing as cheap and good. Guess what? There’s this famous yong tau foo stall in Bedok South Food Centre that’s really cheap and good! Where else can you buy yong tau foo that starts from $1.50 an order? (more…)

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Penang Road's famous Teochew cendol!

Penang Road's famous Teochew cendol!

Folks, this is THE most famous cendol stall in Penang! Many proclaim it to be the best on the island. Just remember, it’s located in Penang Road in Penang!

Technically, it’s in Keng Kwee Street off Penang Road. But no worries, just ask and the friendly locals will point you to the right direction!

Interestingly, directly opposite the No.1 stall is another cendol stall. They claim to be just as good as the original!

So how will the clueless out-of-towner know which is which? Easy! (more…)

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The famous Penang char koay teow at Lorong Selamat

The famous Penang char koay teow stall in Lorong Selamat.

It’s already Day 3, but I’d yet to try the most acclaimed Penang dishes like assam laksa and char koay teow! Well, this was going to be THE day! Our friendly taxi driver “uncle” took us to Lorong Selamat for the famous char koay teow in front of Cafe Heng Huat. Apparently, Lorong Selamat is one of the popular food streets in Penang. There are several roadside stalls and coffee shops that operate there in the day.

The char koay toeow lady in her signature red beret and goggles.

The larger-than-life char koay teow lady in her signature red beret and goggles.

One look, and I knew this is a master at work. Look closely! Deep in concentration, the char koay teow lady silently channels all her energy. Beneath the heavy cast-iron wok are roaring flames fueled by burning charcoal. With her spatula as a natural extension of her arm, she sears and swishes the rice noodles with a mastery that leaves you in awe! (more…)

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